Papercuts

PAPERCUTS> Road&Track Magazine Closing?!

Road&Track Road and Track Magazine shuts down shutting closing closes doors last issue

I can’t believe it. I just received word from a reliable source that Road&Track Magazine will be shutting down its Southern California offices. Can this be true?! This is insane. Everyone knows that the print media industry has been hurting for a while, but hearing reliable sources say that Road&Track is shutting down… that’s one piece of auto industry news that’s hard to fathom. (more…)


PAPERCUTS> AE86 & Rauh Welt in 0-60 Mag

As I was walking through the airport, waiting for my flight back home to Los Angeles on Sunday, I passed one of those airport newsstands, and saw this month's issue of 0-60 Magazine sitting on the magazine rack. Suddenly, I just realized that I forgot to publish a Papercuts story about this month's issue. The current issue of 0-60 is pretty cool, because it pretty much beats the content that a lot of the "major" automotive magazines of their genre have been putting out lately.

It might have been just a kewinkydink, but since we all celebrated Hachiroku Day, August 6th, this past Friday... I thought it would be cool to point out that O-60 Magazine just printed an in depth article about the AE86 this month, in their column, The Sixty.

0-60 knows that most die hard AE86 owners are pretty crazy about their cars, so they were looking for a super clean AE86 to shoot for this month's feature. They apparently heard that I had some pretty clean AE86s in my collection, and called me up to ask if they would be able to do a photo shoot with one of my cars. Actually, they were asking if I'd be willing to shoot one of my cars for the magazine... of course! Everything was all going to be good, until we spoke further, and I realized that they were actually looking for a bone stock AE86 Corolla GT-S. Ummm... oops. None of my cars are bone stock.   Read more...

PAPERCUTS> Project Car Magazine w/ AE86

Project Car Magazine AE86 Special with Taka Aono Corolla Drifter

I just realized that I haven’t posted up a “Papercuts” story in quite some time. To tell you the truth, it’s because I haven’t even bought any car magazines in quite some time. There was a time in my life when I would go to bookstores and hang out, just to check out all the car magazines that were out. My friend Kenta and I would meet up at Barnes & Noble or Borders (or better yet, the Kinokuniya Bookstore in Little Tokyo or Torrance) to check out the latest car magazines every single month. I miss going to bookstores just to chill and check out magazines… I’m not sure if I haven’t been going because I’ve just been busy, or if the magazines these days don’t intrigue me…

Whatever the case may be, I stumbled upon this copy of Project Car Magazine at the CVS Drugstore in Studio City. This issue caught my eye because I saw my friend Taka Aono on the cover; after all, he is the USA’s undisputed top AE86 driver. I thumbed through it really quickly, and decided within 20 seconds, “that’s it. I’m actually gonna buy this issue.” While my 10+ years of Living the 86 Life have led me to own just about every AE86 book or manual that has ever been produced in Japan, it’s honestly pretty rare to see magazines that actually produce good stories about AE86s stateside. I definitely think this magazine was worth the $6 or 7 (ouch!) that I paid at the cash register.

Even though he’s probably the one Source Interlink magazine editor I don’t really know, I really gotta give props to Project Car editor Gary Narusawa and his crew over there. (more…)


PAPERCUTS> Before Rauh Welt, it was ROUGH WORLD.

As I was looking through my bookshelf today, I noticed one of my favorite issues of Hashiriya Battle Magazine laying out. It was a special AE86 issue from 1997, and even though there were always lots of AE86s in BM in general, they somehow figured out how to stuff more AE86 issues in there! God bless you, Takahashi san (BM's henshucho, or chief editor) and Battle Magazine. Battle Magazine has brought joy to my life.

Many of you might roll your eyes after reading that statement... but seriously, if it weren't for BM and my other favorite Japanese mags, the only publications my friends and I would have been able to flip through all these years would be the American "import car" magazines, which always featured bright colored, custom stereo-with-neon, non functional rollcage-having, widebody-without-wide-wheels showcars on their covers. (The US magazines have improved a little bit since then... but just try to dig up an old import magazine from 1997 and you'll know what I'm talking about.)

Anyway, this particular AE86 special issue of BM is one of my favorite magazines in existence because of a feature on the legendary AE86 crew, Rough World. Of course, I couldn't read the text, but what was presented to me in color photographs really messed my head up. I didn't even know what it was at first; I just thought the cars looked so cool. At that point, I hadn't even figured out it was because of the perfect blend of camber, stretched tires, wide wheels, and slam that made the cars look so cool.   Read more...

PAPERCUTS> 1969 Mazda Carol in Daytona

I was hanging out at the Cipher Garage with Antonio recently and we were flipping through his massive collection of old magazines, most of which he's shot fantastic photos for. One of them was Daytona, a Japanese market magazine that mostly covers imports — in this case that means American cars. But being the nostalgic JDM nut that I am, this wicked 1969 Mazda Carol caught my eye. I had actually seen this a couple of years ago in Japan, and you can see a few photos of it in the Japanese Nostalgic Car gallery of the New Year Meeting classic car show.   Read more...

PAPERCUTS> Someone actually made this FF Corolla cool!

For years and years, we've been real big fans of J's Tipo Magazine, which started life as a Japanese magazine devoted to old school modified cars, or kyusha kai. J's Tipo is a product of Tokyo-based Neko Publishing, which also produces a lot of other cool car magazines. Since J's Tipo has a different chief editor than when it first started, the magazine's content shifted slightly to reflect the tastes of the new editor-in-chief, so unfortunately, we no longer see as many old school cars in J's Tipo as we used to.   Read more...